Overhand Straight


Sometimes your straight gets blocked or parried too much. This can happen often if your opponent is used to a straight that comes down the pipe. If this does happen, then throwing an overhand straight can help you land your straight. This punch is not to be confused with an overhand right or a looping straight, which are more similar to hooks than they are to straights.

What is an Overhand Straight:

An overhand straight is a variation of the regular straight. But whereas the straight goes down the pipe, straight from your guard to its target, the overhand straight goes over the pipe to its target. If you imagine a pipe from your guard to your target and the overhand straight is supposed to go over this pipe, then you can also imagine that the punch slightly loops over the top. This slight loop should be just enough for you to connect over the top of your opponent’s guard. But the main problem with doing this punch too much is that it uses more energy to throw compared to a straight.

How to Throw an Overhand Straight:

  1. Assuming your stance, start the punch as you would with a regular straight.
  2. You can lean over to your lead hand side and take a step with your lead foot to set up an angle.
  3. Launch your fist from your guard, while lifting your rear elbow up about as you would with a hook. This should help you rotate your arm as it loops over.
  4. Loop your arm over your opponent’s guard as your arm extends.
  5. Connect your punch at the end of the loop.

When to Throw an Overhand Straight:

The overhand straight is not so different from the regular straight, so it can be thrown when you should throw a straight. What’s different with how to use this type of straight is that it depends on your opponent’s tendencies. If an opponent lowers her guard so that her forehead is showing but keeps her guard tight, then an overhand straight should be thrown. If you find that your straight is being parried a lot, then throwing an overhand straight into the mix can help you land. You can disrupt an opponent’s timing and rhythm by using this punch, provided that your opponent expects a regular straight rather than an overhand straight. One thing about this punch should be noted, unless you aim for the temple of your opponent, do not expect this punch to K.O. many people. This is because it is meant to land over your opponent’s guard and on the forehead. At best, this punch will disrupt your opponent so that a K.O. punch can follow.


Among the variations of the straight, the overhand straight is most similar to the basic straight. The only key difference is that it loops over the opponent’s guard. While this punch can be very effective against certain opponents, it uses more energy to throw and it has low knockout potential.

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